Curriculum Vitae: Perfecting your CV


There are many variants to a curriculum vitae and many different way to both write and present one. Here’s a look at some top tips to make your CV shine! We’ve included a simple example down below, although you may choose to have qualifications where highlights are to make navigating your CV efficient.

Main points:

  • You must include contact detail like a phone and email address, and your name at the top. Preferably on the cover letter as well, which should be set out like an official letter. This makes it simple to find where to contact you and the important information is together.
  • Add a career summary – a brief overview of your work history and a bit about you. This should only be a few sentences in your cover letter, but you want this to stand out! If you have experience in the hospitality industry and you want a job in that field, tell them about your industry experience and something that makes you stand out as an employee.
  • Triple check your spelling. It’s incredibly important that you make a good first impression – so have your resume on point.
  • Make sure your email address is appropriate – i.e. johnsmith@email.com – (this should be professional)
  • No photos are necessary unless you are applying for a visual field (television, acting, etc)
  • Choose a clear font. There is nothing worse than reading over a resume that appears dense and hard to read.
  • Try an interesting colour theme or design. Nothing too fancy, but it could be as simple as the headings are a different colour to the text, or there’s a design down one side. You want it to compliment the page, not take over.
  • Cater to the audience – which industry are you aiming for? Adjust your career summary and cover letter to show you’ve put in thought. There’s no need to include jobs from when you were in high school or university unless it’s relevant to the position you’re applying for (or have a low volume of work history). Leave out jobs you held for less than a month.
  • Keep it short. A few dot points about your duties under each position is enough. Too much text is overwhelming and off-putting. The rest can be said in an interview.
  • Use past-tense unless it’s your current position.
  • If you’ve earned a higher qualification, don’t put the stepping stones to that in. I.e. If you have a Diploma of Business, there is no need to say you have a Certificate II in Business as the Diploma overrules it.
  • Lastly, have your name in bold at the beginning. Be proud of your achievements and show some character.

Check out our other career tips here.

Career Change and FAQ


Changing careers is actually fairly common, most people will have 2 or 3 different careers during their lifetime. If you’re thinking about maybe changing career because your values or lifestyle has changed, we’ve put together some tips to help you work through your questions. It can be a daunting prospect to throw in the towel and embark on a different career with different people and a skill set you may not yet have.

Figure out the whys

Do you know why you want to leave your job? Are you unhappy with your colleagues, the culture, or the industry in general? It helps to keep a work diary for a week or two and record your emotions and productivity to see what it is about the experience that is causing dissatisfaction. This will help you narrow down the attributes you’re looking for in a new career and remind you of the skills you already have.

Where to next?

What do you want your new career to look like? Do you want to change roles but stay in the same industry, or change it up altogether? Write a list of the skill you currently have and a separate list of dream jobs or skills. Keep in mind your current lifestyle, as this will potentially change with a new career. As an example – frequent travel may not be ideal if you are raising a young family or have other regular commitments.
We’ve written a post on Choosing the Right Career.

Assess what you’ve got

Your years of experience may be all you need to make a lateral move into a different job with similar skill sets. All employers value effective communication, problem solving, creative thinking skills and initiative. List these in your cover letter, and have examples of where you’ve shown them ready for interviews.
See our management skill blog for some ideas!

Friendly advice

Do you know anyone who is already working in your dream job or industry? Offer them a coffee in return for some details of what their job entails and what skills they deem most necessary. Keep your expectations realistic and grounded. As a result, you might even make some new contacts that will be valuable in your new industry.

Back to school

If you need extra qualifications, RPL, or just to upgrade a few skills, Linden is right here to give you the support and knowledge you need. Trawling through job ads will give you a good indication of what level of qualification is industry standard.
If you need some help getting back into the study groove : Understanding Successful Study.

Networking!

Now’s the time to flex that LinkedIn muscle. Make connections and follow influencers in your chosen profession. Someone who’s passionate and engaged both online and in real life will appeal more to employers. For that reason, attending workshops and conferences can be a great method to meet a range of people in the industry and make new connections that may be useful for future work.

Track your happiness

Finally, the last tip is to assess how you’re feeling every step of the way. Does your career change fill you with dread or excitement? Are you excited to learn more or does it feel like homework? Let your research take you on tangents and find that fine line between using your head and trusting your gut.

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Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ)
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Can I receive credit for my previous studies?

If you already have qualifications or experience in your chosen study area, you may be able to receive credit towards a Linden College course in a related study area. Our Recognition of Prior Learning (RPL) process can save you valuable time and money and help you start your career sooner.

What is a certified copy?

A certified copy of a document is a photocopy of the original that has been certified as a true copy by an authorised person. When you provide us with a scanned copy or photocopy of a document, it must be certified. All pages of submitted supporting documents must be certified. Make sure your current name is added to any documents you supply with your former names (if applicable).

Where can I get my documents certified?

In Australia a Justice of the Peace can certify your documents. You can also have them certified by a police officer, Commissioner of Declarations, bank manager, pharmacist, education agent, solicitor, barrister or patent attorney. If you are certifying your documents in your home country, the official records department of the institution that originally issued the documents can certify them for you. You can also have your documents certified by a notary public or an education agent.

What are your academic entry requirements?

The entry requirements for our certificate III, IV, diploma and advanced diploma courses require a Year 12 qualification level or equivalent. See the equivalent qualifications in your country.

What are your English language entry requirements?

Applicants to Linden College are required to meet a minimum standard of English language proficiency as assessed by the International English Language Testing System (IELTS). Entry requirements vary between courses. Visit the English entry requirements page for IELTS score equivalencies and more information.

What is VET?

VET stands for Vocational Education and Training. This is the type of accredited training that Linden College delivers. It is a tertiary level of education that delivers job-related training, industry-based outcomes, and technical skill sets.

Management Skills, What Are They?


Management skills:

First of all, let’s review what we mean by management skills. These are skills are universal, and apply not just to physical and mental management, but also to managing yourself as an individual. Number one on this list is communication; being clear and concise with those around you and your workmates is a premier skill. Let’s make a list to show the skills them clearly.

Communication

  • Clear, concise – both written and spoken forms
  • Using the right language with customers, being encouraging, being time efficient with meetings, negotiation, and keeping the lines of communication open between employees are just some of the ways where communication is really important. Sometimes it takes practice, but being conscious and observing others can help you pick up those small tips and tricks to nail communication.

Technical skills

  • Know the company, know the job, know the product. This may also include IT skills, social media, reports and presentations, data security, etc. These really are individualised to the position at hand. Mental investment in the company pays off if you’re looking for a higher-level job.

Motivation

  • In terms of your motivation in addition to the motivation of employees. You can do this through providing appreciation, incentives for performance, supporting workmates who are under stress, and empowering employees to be proud of their work.
  • Motivation makes the environment not only more positive, but also more energetic, and productive.

Problem solving

  • Problem solving skills are useful in every situation, we all have to identify and work through issues. Working this problem back to its origins and understanding the cause helps you to see and predict future problems too.
  • This would also include planning as a form of problem prevention

Innovation

  • Innovation is shown through solutions to customer needs, creative marketing campaigns, redesigning or altering processes to create a more productive, functional, and smooth flow.

Professionalism

  • This is what makes you stand out as a leader. Diplomacy, strong moral values, initiative, as well as curating an excellent customer service attitude shows your employees the standard to strive for.

Other skills that are super important to demonstrate as a manager of anything (these are combinations of/ or subcategories that needed special mention):

  • Planning – effective, anticipatory, and course of actions plans
  • Organising – hand-in-hand with planning, organising is fairly essential in managing yourself, projects, and teams.
  • Directing – similar to communication, directing is more about being able to distribute tasks in an effective way to streamline projects.

So now you know the skills, how do you work on improving yours? Honestly, you need to be conscious and observe others. That’s the simplest way to see how it’s done; then you can start implementing version of what you see (so long as it’s appropriate). You may do this through practicing communication with friends and family, showing innovation and problem solving with your daily tasks or assignments, and, motivating yourself and those around you. This way you can see what works and what doesn’t, and when you show these skills in the workplace you will demonstrate your potential as a manager.

Check out our BSB51915 Diploma of Leadership and Management if you feel like you want to upgrade your management skills.

Choosing the Right Career


Exciting

Wouldn’t it be great to be in a career that you love, doing exciting things and feeling like you made the right choice every day? It can be stressful to make that decision, or even start thinking about it. Most young school leavers feel pushed to make a choice so early, and feel they will be trapped in what they choose forever. But that is not the case, most people change careers two or three times in their lifetime. So making a change when you’ve realised you don’t like a career, or like something else better, doesn’t have to be the end of the world.

Purposeful

For many millennials, the predominant factor is finding work that is purposeful. You know, that thing that makes you get up in the morning, the passion for accomplishment. There are a few steps you can take to narrow down the surprising amount of choice in front of you.

  1. Find what you’re passionate about? What do you find yourself thinking about or doing in your spare time? Maybe you actually really like maths class, or you enjoy writing songs or poems.
  2. What are you actually good at? Be realistic about it, but also realise that most things get better with practice. Keep at it!
  3. Do one of those career quizzes, it could tell you something you don’t know; such as this: http://joboutlook.gov.au/CareerQuiz.aspx
  4. Try an internship or ask for advice from someone in the field. Internships can be excellent ways of finding out the reality of the job and if you do really enjoy it.
  5. If all else fails, take some time to figure it out. Taking a gap year and working a temporary retail position can give you the time to see what you are passionate and interested in. Maybe you’ll even enjoy the retail work and aim for a managerial job?

Career

If you find an interest in a not-so-mainstream career path, make sure to plan how to get there. Being an artist or musician or poet (stereotypical alternative pathways) can still work out better for you than a corporate/retail position. You may even make it into a business.

If you want to start a career but aren’t ready for university, we offer short courses in business, accounting and management.

For those of you who want to be leaders; are good at maths; or want to make their passion into a business.

Here’s our course catalogue: https://lindencollege.edu.au/faculty-schools/course-catalogue/

The Accounting Industry: What it’s like.


The Accounting Industry

There’s been talk that the accounting industry might be declining thanks to technological advancements. But this is simply not true. Accounting has too many complexities and intricacies for a machine. Most individuals and every company in every industry needs an accountant.

There are many different types of accountants, and many different area to work in. Some examples include – accounts administrators, reconciliation clerks, accounts payable, accounts receivable, bookkeepers and SMSF administrators.

Then there are accountants who work in accounting practices. These accountants have roles  such as – auditing (who examine company’s financial statements), management accounting, taxation advising or business services. Business services accountants work across all areas of accounting consulting to small business and individuals.

Some accountants are consultants, who help businesses with their decision making, or in specialist tax areas, like film production. Other accounting roles include forensic accounting – which involves fraud prevention and detection; cost accountants, project accountants, as well as analysts.

There are unique areas like environmental accounting, which involves analysing the environmental impacts of business such as the financial damage from ecological disasters.

Do you have a particular interest in an area outside of accounting?  You could combine your passion with work as an accountant within areas – such as a sports or music company. There are also industry specialisations, such as SMSF accountants and Real Estate Trust Accountants.

What Do Accountants Do?

The accounting industry is diverse. Accountants prepare reports, analyse, and assess on many various financial or tax items, which yes, does include tax returns. They also interpret and apply regulation, as well as keep up with ever-changing legislation. A good accountant is adaptable, diligent, committed and detail-orientated. Some accounting positions can be stressful, with tight deadlines. Mostly, accountants also need to be affable, as they work with people.

From our CEO – What do you like most about the accounting industry?

The most interesting thing about the accounting industry is the people you meet. Definitely, its the people, you meet new clients and catch up with old clients. You learn about their life, their family, their business, their investments, their goals and objectives.

Then it’s the problem solving. How can I help this person meet their goals and objectives, how can I help them save on their taxes, is their business tracking well?

Knowing that you can’t please everyone all of the time is important. Knowing that you are helping your clients and getting positive feedback is the ultimate goal for any accountant.

To move up in the accounting ranks;

You can begin an accounting career with a Certificate IV in Accounting and develop the skills and knowledge to move ahead. With a Certificate IV in Accounting your career will commence with jobs such as an accounts clerk, payroll clerk, accounts clerk, bookkeeper or assistant accountant.

Starting with a Certificate IV in Accounting is also a great way to springboard into university with a little prior knowledge. There are many professional associations in Australia including the Australian Bookkeepers Network, Association of Accounting Technicians, and the National Tax and Accountants’ Association.

If you would like to find out more about our Certificate IV in Accounting phone us on 1300 228 338 or complete the contact form and one of our staff will respond to you as soon as possible.