Curriculum Vitae: Perfecting your CV


There are many variants to a curriculum vitae and many different way to both write and present one. Here’s a look at some top tips to make your CV shine! We’ve included a simple example down below, although you may choose to have qualifications where highlights are to make navigating your CV efficient.

Main points:

  • You must include contact detail like a phone and email address, and your name at the top. Preferably on the cover letter as well, which should be set out like an official letter. This makes it simple to find where to contact you and the important information is together.
  • Add a career summary – a brief overview of your work history and a bit about you. This should only be a few sentences in your cover letter, but you want this to stand out! If you have experience in the hospitality industry and you want a job in that field, tell them about your industry experience and something that makes you stand out as an employee.
  • Triple check your spelling. It’s incredibly important that you make a good first impression – so have your resume on point.
  • Make sure your email address is appropriate – i.e. johnsmith@email.com – (this should be professional)
  • No photos are necessary unless you are applying for a visual field (television, acting, etc)
  • Choose a clear font. There is nothing worse than reading over a resume that appears dense and hard to read.
  • Try an interesting colour theme or design. Nothing too fancy, but it could be as simple as the headings are a different colour to the text, or there’s a design down one side. You want it to compliment the page, not take over.
  • Cater to the audience – which industry are you aiming for? Adjust your career summary and cover letter to show you’ve put in thought. There’s no need to include jobs from when you were in high school or university unless it’s relevant to the position you’re applying for (or have a low volume of work history). Leave out jobs you held for less than a month.
  • Keep it short. A few dot points about your duties under each position is enough. Too much text is overwhelming and off-putting. The rest can be said in an interview.
  • Use past-tense unless it’s your current position.
  • If you’ve earned a higher qualification, don’t put the stepping stones to that in. I.e. If you have a Diploma of Business, there is no need to say you have a Certificate II in Business as the Diploma overrules it.
  • Lastly, have your name in bold at the beginning. Be proud of your achievements and show some character.

Check out our other career tips here.

Career Change and FAQ


Changing careers is actually fairly common, most people will have 2 or 3 different careers during their lifetime. If you’re thinking about maybe changing career because your values or lifestyle has changed, we’ve put together some tips to help you work through your questions. It can be a daunting prospect to throw in the towel and embark on a different career with different people and a skill set you may not yet have.

Figure out the whys

Do you know why you want to leave your job? Are you unhappy with your colleagues, the culture, or the industry in general? It helps to keep a work diary for a week or two and record your emotions and productivity to see what it is about the experience that is causing dissatisfaction. This will help you narrow down the attributes you’re looking for in a new career and remind you of the skills you already have.

Where to next?

What do you want your new career to look like? Do you want to change roles but stay in the same industry, or change it up altogether? Write a list of the skill you currently have and a separate list of dream jobs or skills. Keep in mind your current lifestyle, as this will potentially change with a new career. As an example – frequent travel may not be ideal if you are raising a young family or have other regular commitments.
We’ve written a post on Choosing the Right Career.

Assess what you’ve got

Your years of experience may be all you need to make a lateral move into a different job with similar skill sets. All employers value effective communication, problem solving, creative thinking skills and initiative. List these in your cover letter, and have examples of where you’ve shown them ready for interviews.
See our management skill blog for some ideas!

Friendly advice

Do you know anyone who is already working in your dream job or industry? Offer them a coffee in return for some details of what their job entails and what skills they deem most necessary. Keep your expectations realistic and grounded. As a result, you might even make some new contacts that will be valuable in your new industry.

Back to school

If you need extra qualifications, RPL, or just to upgrade a few skills, Linden is right here to give you the support and knowledge you need. Trawling through job ads will give you a good indication of what level of qualification is industry standard.
If you need some help getting back into the study groove : Understanding Successful Study.

Networking!

Now’s the time to flex that LinkedIn muscle. Make connections and follow influencers in your chosen profession. Someone who’s passionate and engaged both online and in real life will appeal more to employers. For that reason, attending workshops and conferences can be a great method to meet a range of people in the industry and make new connections that may be useful for future work.

Track your happiness

Finally, the last tip is to assess how you’re feeling every step of the way. Does your career change fill you with dread or excitement? Are you excited to learn more or does it feel like homework? Let your research take you on tangents and find that fine line between using your head and trusting your gut.

~
Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ)
~

Can I receive credit for my previous studies?

If you already have qualifications or experience in your chosen study area, you may be able to receive credit towards a Linden College course in a related study area. Our Recognition of Prior Learning (RPL) process can save you valuable time and money and help you start your career sooner.

What is a certified copy?

A certified copy of a document is a photocopy of the original that has been certified as a true copy by an authorised person. When you provide us with a scanned copy or photocopy of a document, it must be certified. All pages of submitted supporting documents must be certified. Make sure your current name is added to any documents you supply with your former names (if applicable).

Where can I get my documents certified?

In Australia a Justice of the Peace can certify your documents. You can also have them certified by a police officer, Commissioner of Declarations, bank manager, pharmacist, education agent, solicitor, barrister or patent attorney. If you are certifying your documents in your home country, the official records department of the institution that originally issued the documents can certify them for you. You can also have your documents certified by a notary public or an education agent.

What are your academic entry requirements?

The entry requirements for our certificate III, IV, diploma and advanced diploma courses require a Year 12 qualification level or equivalent. See the equivalent qualifications in your country.

What are your English language entry requirements?

Applicants to Linden College are required to meet a minimum standard of English language proficiency as assessed by the International English Language Testing System (IELTS). Entry requirements vary between courses. Visit the English entry requirements page for IELTS score equivalencies and more information.

What is VET?

VET stands for Vocational Education and Training. This is the type of accredited training that Linden College delivers. It is a tertiary level of education that delivers job-related training, industry-based outcomes, and technical skill sets.

Choosing the Right Career


Exciting

Wouldn’t it be great to be in a career that you love, doing exciting things and feeling like you made the right choice every day? It can be stressful to make that decision, or even start thinking about it. Most young school leavers feel pushed to make a choice so early, and feel they will be trapped in what they choose forever. But that is not the case, most people change careers two or three times in their lifetime. So making a change when you’ve realised you don’t like a career, or like something else better, doesn’t have to be the end of the world.

Purposeful

For many millennials, the predominant factor is finding work that is purposeful. You know, that thing that makes you get up in the morning, the passion for accomplishment. There are a few steps you can take to narrow down the surprising amount of choice in front of you.

  1. Find what you’re passionate about? What do you find yourself thinking about or doing in your spare time? Maybe you actually really like maths class, or you enjoy writing songs or poems.
  2. What are you actually good at? Be realistic about it, but also realise that most things get better with practice. Keep at it!
  3. Do one of those career quizzes, it could tell you something you don’t know; such as this: http://joboutlook.gov.au/CareerQuiz.aspx
  4. Try an internship or ask for advice from someone in the field. Internships can be excellent ways of finding out the reality of the job and if you do really enjoy it.
  5. If all else fails, take some time to figure it out. Taking a gap year and working a temporary retail position can give you the time to see what you are passionate and interested in. Maybe you’ll even enjoy the retail work and aim for a managerial job?

Career

If you find an interest in a not-so-mainstream career path, make sure to plan how to get there. Being an artist or musician or poet (stereotypical alternative pathways) can still work out better for you than a corporate/retail position. You may even make it into a business.

If you want to start a career but aren’t ready for university, we offer short courses in business, accounting and management.

For those of you who want to be leaders; are good at maths; or want to make their passion into a business.

Here’s our course catalogue: https://lindencollege.edu.au/faculty-schools/course-catalogue/

4 Tips To Improve Your Mid-Year Performance Review


Mid-year performance review – What’s on your career horizon?

We all feel a bit of fear coming up to the mid-year performance review, but one of the best things you can do for yourself and your workplace is be prepared. A performance review should be a productive, genuine two-way conversation that is part of a wider work practice of mentoring and staff development, and associated business development. You should feel a little nervous; but by keeping track of your accomplishments and taking note of where you need to or want to improve, you can bring something worthwhile to the table.

Things to think about:

  • Reflect & report on your achievements: 
    • reflect on and honestly assess what you have produced – keep track of you highs and lows, and moments where you received feedback from others, and other outstanding… or not so moments.
  • Focus on what’s next:
    • Think about what you want to achieve – and what you need to make it happen.
    • Do you need to upskill? Set goals, objectives and targets that are realistic and achievable.
  • Don’t take it personally:
    • Critique from your manager should be expected. Constructive criticism is important for you to know where and when to improve yourself and your work.
    • When confronted with a legitimate critique, take a solution focused approach and identify how you plan to correct it moving forward.
  • If you feel you’re due for a promotion or pay rise:
    • You’ll need to have gone above and beyond what was expected of you in your role.
    • State your case, but be prepared to manage your expectations against the business needs.
    • Develop a list of all accomplishments over the year, and be as detailed as possible in expressing targets met and new skills acquired.
    • Demonstrate your commitment to ongoing learning, leadership, coaching or mentoring and further development.
    • Possibly, consider other benefits you might like to receive instead, as a reward for your great efforts. E.g. external training, flexible working arrangements, parking, health insurance or even a gym membership.

This doesn’t need to take a lot of time, keeping a diary throughout the year can save time and stress. A few dot points or prompts can keep your mid-year performance review smooth and fear-free.
We hope these tips can help you get the best from your review!