Choosing the Right Career


Exciting

Wouldn’t it be great to be in a career that you love, doing exciting things and feeling like you made the right choice every day? It can be stressful to make that decision, or even start thinking about it. Most young school leavers feel pushed to make a choice so early, and feel they will be trapped in what they choose forever. But that is not the case, most people change careers two or three times in their lifetime. So making a change when you’ve realised you don’t like a career, or like something else better, doesn’t have to be the end of the world.

Purposeful

For many millennials, the predominant factor is finding work that is purposeful. You know, that thing that makes you get up in the morning, the passion for accomplishment. There are a few steps you can take to narrow down the surprising amount of choice in front of you.

  1. Find what you’re passionate about? What do you find yourself thinking about or doing in your spare time? Maybe you actually really like maths class, or you enjoy writing songs or poems.
  2. What are you actually good at? Be realistic about it, but also realise that most things get better with practice. Keep at it!
  3. Do one of those career quizzes, it could tell you something you don’t know; such as this: http://joboutlook.gov.au/CareerQuiz.aspx
  4. Try an internship or ask for advice from someone in the field. Internships can be excellent ways of finding out the reality of the job and if you do really enjoy it.
  5. If all else fails, take some time to figure it out. Taking a gap year and working a temporary retail position can give you the time to see what you are passionate and interested in. Maybe you’ll even enjoy the retail work and aim for a managerial job?

Career

If you find an interest in a not-so-mainstream career path, make sure to plan how to get there. Being an artist or musician or poet (stereotypical alternative pathways) can still work out better for you than a corporate/retail position. You may even make it into a business.

If you want to start a career but aren’t ready for university, we offer short courses in business, accounting and management.

For those of you who want to be leaders; are good at maths; or want to make their passion into a business.

Here’s our course catalogue: https://lindencollege.edu.au/faculty-schools/course-catalogue/

4 Tips To Improve Your Mid-Year Performance Review


Mid-year performance review – What’s on your career horizon?

We all feel a bit of fear coming up to the mid-year performance review, but one of the best things you can do for yourself and your workplace is be prepared. A performance review should be a productive, genuine two-way conversation that is part of a wider work practice of mentoring and staff development, and associated business development. You should feel a little nervous; but by keeping track of your accomplishments and taking note of where you need to or want to improve, you can bring something worthwhile to the table.

Things to think about:

  • Reflect & report on your achievements: 
    • reflect on and honestly assess what you have produced – keep track of you highs and lows, and moments where you received feedback from others, and other outstanding… or not so moments.
  • Focus on what’s next:
    • Think about what you want to achieve – and what you need to make it happen.
    • Do you need to upskill? Set goals, objectives and targets that are realistic and achievable.
  • Don’t take it personally:
    • Critique from your manager should be expected. Constructive criticism is important for you to know where and when to improve yourself and your work.
    • When confronted with a legitimate critique, take a solution focused approach and identify how you plan to correct it moving forward.
  • If you feel you’re due for a promotion or pay rise:
    • You’ll need to have gone above and beyond what was expected of you in your role.
    • State your case, but be prepared to manage your expectations against the business needs.
    • Develop a list of all accomplishments over the year, and be as detailed as possible in expressing targets met and new skills acquired.
    • Demonstrate your commitment to ongoing learning, leadership, coaching or mentoring and further development.
    • Possibly, consider other benefits you might like to receive instead, as a reward for your great efforts. E.g. external training, flexible working arrangements, parking, health insurance or even a gym membership.

This doesn’t need to take a lot of time, keeping a diary throughout the year can save time and stress. A few dot points or prompts can keep your mid-year performance review smooth and fear-free.
We hope these tips can help you get the best from your review!