Choosing the Right Career


Exciting

Wouldn’t it be great to be in a career that you love, doing exciting things and feeling like you made the right choice every day? It can be stressful to make that decision, or even start thinking about it. Most young school leavers feel pushed to make a choice so early, and feel they will be trapped in what they choose forever. But that is not the case, most people change careers two or three times in their lifetime. So making a change when you’ve realised you don’t like a career, or like something else better, doesn’t have to be the end of the world.

Purposeful

For many millennials, the predominant factor is finding work that is purposeful. You know, that thing that makes you get up in the morning, the passion for accomplishment. There are a few steps you can take to narrow down the surprising amount of choice in front of you.

  1. Find what you’re passionate about? What do you find yourself thinking about or doing in your spare time? Maybe you actually really like maths class, or you enjoy writing songs or poems.
  2. What are you actually good at? Be realistic about it, but also realise that most things get better with practice. Keep at it!
  3. Do one of those career quizzes, it could tell you something you don’t know; such as this: http://joboutlook.gov.au/CareerQuiz.aspx
  4. Try an internship or ask for advice from someone in the field. Internships can be excellent ways of finding out the reality of the job and if you do really enjoy it.
  5. If all else fails, take some time to figure it out. Taking a gap year and working a temporary retail position can give you the time to see what you are passionate and interested in. Maybe you’ll even enjoy the retail work and aim for a managerial job?

Career

If you find an interest in a not-so-mainstream career path, make sure to plan how to get there. Being an artist or musician or poet (stereotypical alternative pathways) can still work out better for you than a corporate/retail position. You may even make it into a business.

If you want to start a career but aren’t ready for university, we offer short courses in business, accounting and management.

For those of you who want to be leaders; are good at maths; or want to make their passion into a business.

Here’s our course catalogue: https://lindencollege.edu.au/faculty-schools/course-catalogue/

Millennial’s in the Workplace


Millennial’s in the Workplace

As the population of millennial’s have entered the workforce, many industries are noting a change in the aspirations of their younger employees. It seems that younger people are moving from job to job more often than their older counterparts. However, they still have solid and evolving career goals. Their goals and lifestyles may be different, but, all the same, millennial’s need to think about their goals and aspirations for each position they apply for.  These are some things to note, that potential employers might ask you about when applying for a job.

1. What are your short-term career goals?

When a recruiter asks “What are your short-term career goals?” they are really trying to ascertain whether you are going to leave as soon as you get a better offer, says Amy Adler, a career coach and the founder of Five Strengths.

Kim Ann Curtin, executive coach and the author of Transforming Wall Street, agrees that priority number-one for most interviewers is to get a sense of the likelihood that you’ll stick around.

“The biggest fear employers have with millennial’s right now is that they won’t stay and have a tendency to leave after a year or two,” Curtin said.

2. What are your long-term career goals?

This question is aimed at figuring out whether you are realistic about the career path in this industry, your intentions for the future and the reason you’re interested in the job, Curtin says.

“Headhunters are looking for what millennial’s say that indicates how likely they are to stick around,” she said. “That’s at the heart of what headhunters are asking millennial’s about.”

Sometimes the question is rephrased as “What do you see as your next step after this job?”, but it’s basically trying to find out the same thing.

“Do they want to be out in a year, or promoted within a year?” said Alyssa Gelbard, the founder and president of Resume Strategists. “Baby Boomers don’t have that expectation of ‘I gotta be in, then I gotta get out and move on to the next thing.’”

This is the classic “where do you see yourself in five years?” The company wants to know if you will be a committed employee, willing to invest yourself into your career – with them.

3. How do you handle feedback?

A common way of wording this question is “What kind of feedback do you want to receive and how often?”

Questions related to handling feedback or constructive criticism are geared toward evaluating how well you respond to being given direction and redirection, Adler said.

“There’s a big difference between the way feedback is delivered in school and on the job,” said Gelbard. “Millennial’s should talk about times when they’ve had to handle something difficult, dealing with a client in person or over the phone, not just via text or email.”

This can also be a tangential way of gauging how sensitive you are and how you respond when things don’t go your way. Talk about a time when you were passed over for a promotion or an award that you felt you deserved and how you handled that disappointing situation. Be diplomatic.

“They should demonstrate that they’re OK dealing with failure, lack of success,” Gelbard said. “Working at a bank or hedge fund in the financial sector, not everyone gets a trophy, so hiring managers want to know, ‘How did you handle a time when you weren’t successful?’ – they value resiliency.”

4. What’s your ideal workday schedule?

Adler suggested hiring managers ask this one to make sure you are going to show up on time and work the proper number of hours within the firm’s standard work day.

It’s important to be in tune to how your job responsibilities can bleed into your life outside the office.

“Millennial’s in the industry should keep in mind that the person you’re interviewing with has probably gotten accustomed to the fact that you’re always on, seven days a week,” Curtin said. “Even after working long hours in the office, now everyone’s on their phone checking work emails 24/7.”

Talk about a project, assignment, presentation or deal that ran longer than expected or another example of how you faced unexpected challenges, Gelbard said.

5. How do you define “rewarding” work?

This one can be translated as: “What do you need to feel appreciated?” Adler said. Candidates considering a career in financial services should go in with eyes wide open that their job is all about the money.

“Millennial’s should realize that they are likely speaking to an organization that is not quite as evolved as they will eventually become,” Curtin said. “Millennial’s coming from a place of wanting to make a positive contribution and work a job that has value in the world need to dial it down”.

“That doesn’t mean you don’t want to be authentic, but maybe it’s not as important a conversation to have with [hiring managers] on Wall Street as it would be with those at more future-focused, younger companies,” she said.

Hiring managers are looking for an alignment of what the millennial candidate thinks the job requires and the actual responsibilities that the role entails, Gelbard said.

“Interviewers want to know what they’re expecting to do – ‘What do you think this job requires?’” she said. “Candidates may have a great work ethic and skills, but if they have no clue what they’d be expected to do if they were hired, that could be a problem.

6. What is your ideal work environment or company culture?

During any interview, the interviewer takes a look at the candidate’s lifestyle, searching for indicators of a cultural fit, or lack thereof.

“Do some work around talking to people who are already in the organization,” Curtin said. “This is about getting you in the door, who you are, your authenticity, ultimately you need that person interviewing you to feel that you’re one of them and you understand how their firm works, be informed about the culture, speak in ways that communicates that you’re comfortable with that culture and it’ll be a fit.

7. What are some of your hobbies?

While not every interview will ask this one, those who do are really trying to figure out whether or not they’d like to work with you on a daily basis. Is this person fun?

“If you’re in someone’s office, look for something that you have in common and you can get them to talk about that’s not work-related – human interaction between you can only help,” Curtin said. “You don’t just want to be locked into formal interview mode – you want to form a personal connection. It helps to build rapport for future conversations/interviews.

“They’re a human being, so say something that makes them feel like you see them that way,” she said. “‘You like the Yankees? I love the Yankees!’”

 

Millennial’s have their own benefits to offer older companies too. New ideas, a younger outlook, something to help to company grow into the future and evolve. They are adaptable and creative.

Older counterparts have had time to build their career and gain experience. Millennial’s are looking for companies to invest in them, in the same way that they are looking to invest in their career.

 

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Staying Healthy While Studying


Studying is hard, and it takes a lot of brain power. So to keep you fueled the healthy way, we’ve put together some tips for you.

8 Tips to keep you healthy:

  • Obviously I’m going to say eat your fruit and vegetables. Not only do these delicious foods supply us with nutrients and vitamins, but also are much healthier than the chips I bet you ate sometime this week
  • Don’t forget the carbohydrates! Try to keep it minimally processed (e.g. brown rice, instead of white). Plants are grown to be the perfect package.
  • If in need, baked beans are a poor/time poor student’s best friend.
  • Snacks (YES!) Snacks are what students are all about. Keep it light with some nuts, blueberries, or watermelon to keep you hydrated and fueled (yes, frozen is fine). Bananas are also great for a rushing-to-class snack.
  • Cook in bulk, if it’s easiest. You can make enough rice and curry to last a week without too much fuss.
  • Drink water regularly! Being dehydrated slows you down, both mentally and physically.
  • Exercise – going for a walk around the block (or further) lets you take a break from study and keeps your muscles and lymphatic system pumping.
  • Take breaks. Extended periods of sitting and reading can be just as harmful to you and not studying can be to your grades. Get up and do a quick tidy up, or cook a meal while you listen to music, grab a coffee, or if you dare – watch a YouTube video.